Interview with Audrius Razma, Author of 'Sakura in the Gravity'

 Sep. 26, 2020

I was privileged to invite Author Audrius Razma for an interview to discuss his latest book Sakura in the Gravity and the inspiration behind it. Enjoy! 


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What's your book about, and what inspired you to write it?
I am planning to write in a sequel I thought of while I was on vacation. The storyline of a sequel I am writing is crime genre, about three friends seeking for a friendship while on vacation to bring back feelings of belonging back from years taken apart from them but are accidentally recruited for most elite and wildest NATO Private Security Squad ever. I enjoy writing autobiography into fiction and I create protagonists from memories of friends from childhood. I am giving the fictional characters their personalities, some opportunities and wild adventures where they're at the end to find the happiness. 

The aforementioned storyline travels from Japan, Korea, United Kingdom to Austria.

Who is your target audience, and why do you think this book will appeal to them?
I am creating stories with interest to convert into anime series. But the actual audience is anyone thinking to see something new in contemporary market. But for now while I am writing each piece after I publish I will develop anime based role play games to allow more freedom for my readers to chose theirs favourite protagonist and create the faith other than I have written. 

I do enjoy listening to people who read what I write and I always look forward to their suggestions to see what they would like to be in what I write for them.

What message do you wish to pass across to your readers with this book?
I am hoping to let others know, to create and write a book does not take you to be born in England and study Masters in English. You're yourself unique with another journey taken in life and sharing the creative side of it will benefit not only you.

What was the hardest thing about writing your latest book?
I am losing my focus often enough and end up publishing new chapters with grammatical mistakes.

As a writer, is there anything you've learned about yourself while writing this book?
I was exploring phobias and I learned I have fear of betrayal.

For your own reading, do you prefer ebooks or traditional paper/hard back books, and why? 
I do prefer ebooks but I do enjoy good print paperback in mind the size and cover with pages quality. I prefer myself soft feel cover and pages for my fingertips and pocket size print to be convenient to carry.

What is your niche genre, and if you were to write in a different genre, what would it be?
I think I would find hard to handle romance genre but I am actually planning in time to come to publish romance fiction from experience I had in my previous relationship.

What books and authors have most influenced you?
I had no strong impressions from any writers but I am huge fan of filmmakers Takeshi Kitano and Guy Richie.

Do you have any more books in the works?
After I complete Sakura in the Gravity, I will continue the sequel and publish in order, Korean Madness, Orthodox Britain and European Identity.

Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with bad or good ones?
I do enjoy any bad or good comments because I write about crime.

Any advice to new/aspiring authors: I hope you will not give up to write because those who write will live on forever.

How can readers get in touch with or follow you (website, personal blog, social media handle, Goodreads)?

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I am a native Lithuanian and I am writing to help readers rediscover their subcultures. I'm not a seasoned writer yet but I am passionate about building fantasy platforms to share.

I am hoping to be known for as a Lithuanian who can create and write stories in English, and also set a benchmark for the rest of Lithuanians. We are a small population, and with none yet capable to define writing in English at least to my scale and knowledge.

I know there are plenty of writers out there but I am lucky enough to think I am in a position to be known not as the best writer in a category of native English writer, but from foreign language writers who are portraying unique footprints with their own cultural footprints.

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5 Books by Black Authors You Need to Get Your Hands (And Eyes) on



There are 5 books I truly think everyone in the world needs to pick up and read; doesn't matter if you’re male, female, black, brown, white -- whatever gender you are or race you're from.

Even if your heart sings for a different genre, or perhaps you’re not much of a reader (which I should think you sort of are, if you’re reading this post 😉), I implore -- or perhaps dare -- you to read one of these books I've listed below. You don’t know how you’ll feel about it if you don’t try it, so... try it. They’re great books that embody all that literature is about – opening our eyes to things and truths we never saw or even knew were there. They all push boundaries and share powerful messages that are meant to be shared -- messages on racial prejudice, discrimination, inequality, body image, the strive for perfection, societal pressure, and so on. So here I am, sharing. Enjoy!


1. Genesis Begins Again  by Alicia D. Williams, 2020

This deeply sensitive and powerful debut novel tells the story of a thirteen-year-old who must overcome internalized racism and a verbally abusive family to finally learn to love herself.

There are ninety-six things Genesis hates about herself. She knows the exact number because she keeps a list. Like #95: Because her skin is so dark, people call her charcoal and eggplant—even her own family. And #61: Because her family is always being put out of their house, belongings laid out on the sidewalk for the world to see. When your dad is a gambling addict and loses the rent money every month, eviction is a regular occurrence.

What’s not so regular is that this time they all don’t have a place to crash, so Genesis and her mom have to stay with her grandma. It’s not that Genesis doesn’t like her grandma, but she and Mom always fight—Grandma haranguing Mom to leave Dad, that she should have gone back to school, that if she’d married a lighter skinned man none of this would be happening, and on and on and on. But things aren’t all bad. Genesis actually likes her new school; she’s made a couple friends, her choir teacher says she has real talent, and she even encourages Genesis to join the talent show.

But how can Genesis believe anything her teacher says when her dad tells her the exact opposite? How can she stand up in front of all those people with her dark, dark skin knowing even her own family thinks lesser of her because of it? Why, why, why won’t the lemon or yogurt or fancy creams lighten her skin like they’re supposed to? And when Genesis reaches #100 on the list of things she hates about herself, will she continue on, or can she find the strength to begin again?


2. Freshwater – by Akwaeke Emezi, 2018

One of the most highly praised novels of the year, the debut from an astonishing young writer, Freshwater tells the story of Ada, an unusual child who is a source of deep concern to her southern Nigerian family. Young Ada is troubled, prone to violent fits. Born “with one foot on the other side,” she begins to develop separate selves within her as she grows into adulthood. And when she travels to America for college, a traumatic event on campus crystallizes the selves into something powerful and potentially dangerous, making Ada fade into the background of her own mind as these alters—now protective, now hedonistic—move into control. Written with stylistic brilliance and based in the author’s realities, Freshwater dazzles with ferocious energy and serpentine grace.


3. Homegoing – by Yaa Gyasi, 2017

Ghana, eighteenth century: two half sisters are born into different villages, each unaware of the other. One will marry an Englishman and lead a life of comfort in the palatial rooms of the Cape Coast Castle. The other will be captured in a raid on her village, imprisoned in the very same castle, and sold into slavery.
 
Homegoing follows the parallel paths of these sisters and their descendants through eight generations: from the Gold Coast to the plantations of Mississippi, from the American Civil War to Jazz Age Harlem. Yaa Gyasi’s extraordinary novel illuminates slavery’s troubled legacy both for those who were taken and those who stayed—and shows how the memory of captivity has been inscribed on the soul of our nation.


4. The Hate U Give – by Angie Thomas, 2017
Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed.
Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil’s name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr.
But what Starr does—or does not—say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life.

5. Hunger – by Roxanne Gay, 2017

In her phenomenally popular essays and long-running Tumblr blog, Roxane Gay has written with intimacy and sensitivity about food and body, using her own emotional and psychological struggles as a means of exploring our shared anxieties over pleasure, consumption, appearance, and health. As a woman who describes her own body as “wildly undisciplined,” Roxane understands the tension between desire and denial, between self-comfort and self-care. In Hunger, she explores her past—including the devastating act of violence that acted as a turning point in her young life—and brings readers along on her journey to understand and ultimately save herself.
With the bracing candor, vulnerability, and power that have made her one of the most admired writers of her generation, Roxane explores what it means to learn to take care of yourself: how to feed your hungers for delicious and satisfying food, a smaller and safer body, and a body that can love and be loved—in a time when the bigger you are, the smaller your world becomes.


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Interview with Taetrece Harrison, Author of B!tch Hunt

 Sep 22, 2020

I was privileged to invite Author Taetrece Harrison for an interview to discuss her latest book B!tch Hunt and the inspiration behind it. Enjoy! 


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What's your book about, and what inspired you to write it?
Each chapter is about a different woman and their stories are true. Each woman is an attorney; however, some are judges, or were a judge or a candidate for judge. Each story discusses the life of each woman slightly from the beginning, their education and start of their career. The story develops into a conflict which occurs with each of them. All of the conflicts are different but their situations are similar because of who they are perceived to be the known or unknown person or persons who initiate the conflict.  The stories are told from a narrative standpoint.

Who is your target audience, and why do you think this book will appeal to them?
Perfect for fans of non-fiction, women in the 30’s to 60’s will find themselves riveted by the power behind the women discussed within the pages of this book. This book is about women empowerment.

What message do you wish to pass across to your readers with this book?
Standing in your truth no matter what, even if it means standing alone.

What was the hardest thing about writing your latest book?
My prioritizing my work schedule with my writing schedule. Staying focused.

As a writer, is there anything you've learned about yourself while writing this book?
Yes I am a much better writer than I thought that I was.

For your own reading, do you prefer ebooks or traditional paper/hard back books, and why?  
Hardcover then paperback. But definitely a physical book.

What is your niche genre, and if you were to write in a different genre, what would it be?
Narrative Nonfiction

What books and authors have most influenced you?
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, By Maya Angelou 
Dear God, It’s Me Margaret, By Judy Blume 
Wuthering Heights, By Emily Brontë

Is there anything you'd like readers to know about you?
I am humbled by all of the amazing support from everyone.

Do you have any more books in the works?
The Wrinkled Robes-Corrupted Judges

Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with bad or good ones?
I appreciate any feedback because it allows me to improve my writing.

Any advice to new/aspiring authors: 
Don’t doubt yourself, and write your book.

How can readers get in touch with or follow you (website, personal blog, social media handle, Goodreads)?

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Taetrece Harrison happily lives in New Orleans, Louisiana, she fights for justice by day as an attorney and by night she puts on her author or poetry hat depending on her mood. When she isn’t writing, Taetrece enjoys attending festivals or singing karaoke.





Interview with Karamokoh Wurie, Author of 'The Self-Empowerment Journal: Revised Edition'

Sep 16, 2020

I was privileged to invite Author Karamokoh Wurie for an interview to discuss his latest book The Self-Empowerment Journal: Revised Edition and the inspiration behind it. Enjoy! 


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VIEW ON AMAZON
What's your book about, and what inspired you to write it?
My book is about is about self improvement, personal transformation, personal motivation, and creating an online business. 

What's your book about, and what inspired you to write it?
I was feeling lost and stuck at one point in my life. I faced a lot of stress and anxiety. I was able to overcome all these using some of the practical techniques outlined this book. I just thought somebody else could use those techniques to transform their lives.

Who is your target audience, and why do you think this book will appeal to them?
My target audience is anybody who is feeling stuck, depressed, and trying to figure out life, this book for them. Also for entrepreneurs who are trying to have a break through in their business.

This book will appeal to them because it has proven strategies and method that is going to take them from where they are to where they want to be in life.

What message do you wish to pass across to your readers with this book?
No matter who you are, no matter what you are going through, you have the power to overcome and turn your life around.

What was the hardest thing about writing your latest book?
The hardest thing was going through the publishing process. Since this is my first book and I wanted to get my message across, I was very motivated. Unfortunately, I ran into some untrustworthy people that wouldn't fulfill their obligation. I ran into a lot of setbacks during the process of writing this book but I never gave up.

As a writer, is there anything you've learned about yourself while writing this book?
I learned that I am very relentless person. I keep going no matter what.

For your own reading, do you prefer ebooks or traditional paper/hard back books, and why?  
I like paper/hard backs books. I just like to see the books on my shelves. I like to be able to hold the book.

What is your niche genre, and if you were to write in a different genre, what would it be?
My genre is Self help/Personal development. If I were to write in a different genre it would be Biography/Memoirs. I like learning about other people and get inspired in the process. My life has also been a remarkable story that I think would inspire other people.

What books and authors have most influenced you?
The books and authors that have influenced me are: Conversation with God by Neale Donald Walsch. As a man thinketh by James Allen, and The Power of Positive thinking by Norman Vincent Peale.

Is there anything you'd like readers to know about you?
Yes, and this may not relate to anything but I really love going to gym. I like staying active.

Do you have any more books in the works?
I've already gotten concepts and ideas for my next book but I still just want to focus all my energy onto this book to make sure it gets in the hands of the right people whom my ideas may be at services to.

Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with bad or good ones?
Yes. So far I've been getting a lot of positive reviews. For the bad ones, I just uses them as constructive criticism. I look at every reviews, whether good or bad is just another helping hand to make me a better writer. It like the saying "You can't see the picture when you are in the frame."

Any advice to new/aspiring authors: 
Write! Join Facebook groups of other writers.

How can readers get in touch with or follow you (website, personal blog, social media handle, Goodreads)?
My website is: www.kwurie.com
Instagram: @_kingmoko_

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Karamokoh Wurie was born in Free Town Sierra Leone, West Africa. After a challenging childhood, Karamokoh was moved to the United States. He lived in Alexandria, Virginia, where he attended sixth grade. Following high school, Karamokoh attended VCU (Virginia Commonwealth University) before enlisting into the Army. His army duty stations include the 36th Engineer Brigade in Fort Hood, Texas. The 214th Aviation in Wiesbaden, Germany. The 16th MP and 83rd Civil Affairs in Fort Bragg, North Carolina. The 65th Medical Brigade in Camp Humphreys, South Korea. Karamokoh did two tours in Afghanistan in Support of “Operation Enduring Freedom,” and was also part of the detail team for “Operation Anakonda,” that took place in Poland. For his service in the military, and as of date: Karamokoh has been awarded an Army Commendation medal, three Army Achievements, three Army Good Conduct Medals, One National Defense Service Medal, Two Afghan Campaign medals, one Global War on Terrorism Medal, one National Defense, one None Commission Officer Professional Developmental Ribbon, one Army Service Ribbon, one Oversea Service Ribbon